Skip to content ↓
  • Inspiring Individuals
  • Empowering Minds
  • Defining Futures

PSHE & Citizenship

Subject PSHE & Citizenship
Contact Mrs Watts

Overview

Personal, Social, Health, Economic and Citizenship education enables students to develop the knowledge, skills and attributes they need to keep themselves healthy and safe, prepare for life and work in modern Britain and play a full and active part in society as responsible citizens.

Our programme of Study for PSHE and Citizenship education aims to develop skills and attributes such as resilience, self-esteem, risk-management, team working and critical thinking.

Core themes are explored in a number of ways :

  1. Through timetabled lessons delivered by Group Tutors on a rolling programme .
  2. Embedded into delivery across curriculum subjects
  3. As part of our assembly schedule
  4. During Enrichment week (for KS3 students)
Citizenship Themes PSHE Themes
Democracy and political systems Health and Wellbeing
Law and Justice Sex and Relationships
Finance / community Living in the Wider World

KS3 

At Key stage 3 students learn about:

  • the development of the political system of democratic government in the United Kingdom, including the roles of citizens, Parliament and the monarch
  • the operation of Parliament, including voting and elections, and the role of political parties
  • the precious liberties enjoyed by the citizens of the United Kingdom
  • the nature of rules and laws and the justice system, including the role of the police and the operation of courts and tribunals
  • the roles played by public institutions and voluntary groups in society, and the ways in which citizens work together to improve their communities, including opportunities to participate in school-based activities
  • the functions and uses of money, the importance and practice of budgeting, and managing risk.

KS4 

At Key Stage 4 students learn about:

  • parliamentary democracy and the key elements of the constitution of the United Kingdom, including the power of government, the role of citizens and Parliament in holding those in power to account, and the different roles of the executive, legislature and judiciary and a free press
  • the different electoral systems used in and beyond the United Kingdom and actions citizens can take in democratic and electoral processes to influence decisions locally, nationally and beyond
  • other systems and forms of government, both democratic and non-democratic, beyond the United Kingdom
  • local, regional and international governance and the United Kingdom’s relations with the rest of Europe, the Commonwealth, the United Nations and the wider world
  • human rights and international law
  • the legal system in the UK, different sources of law and how the law helps society deal with complex problems
  • diverse national, regional, religious and ethnic identities in the United Kingdom and the need for mutual respect and understanding
  • the different ways in which a citizen can contribute to the improvement of his or her community, to include the opportunity to participate actively in community volunteering, as well as other forms of responsible activity
  • income and expenditure, credit and debt, insurance, savings and pensions, financial products and services, and how public money is raised and spent.

british values 

  • an understanding of how citizens can influence decision-making through the democratic process;
  • an appreciation that living under the rule of law protects individual citizens and is essential for their wellbeing and safety;
  • an understanding that there is a separation of power between the executive and the judiciary, and that while some public bodies such as the police and the army can be held to account through Parliament, others such as the courts maintain independence;
  • an understanding that the freedom to choose and hold other faiths and beliefs is protected in law;
  • an acceptance that other people having different faiths or beliefs to oneself (or having none) should be accepted and tolerated, and should not be the cause of prejudicial or discriminatory behaviour.
  • an understanding of the importance of identifying and combatting discrimination.